Post-mortems in the asylum and issues of consent

Asylum Science

Our last post explored why post-mortems were considered essential to the scientific study of mental illness in the 19th century, with the procedure establishing cause of death and gathering pathological information that could be correlated with clinical notes taken during life. How was consent for post-mortems obtained, though, and how much input did patients’ friends and families have on the practice?

Seeking consent

That the bodies of asylum patients were considered important repositories of knowledge can be seen in the efforts made by asylum doctors to secure them for post-mortem examination. Eric Engstrom, investigating German psychiatric clinics, describes how ‘valuable neuropathological specimens’ were offered free beds in order to obtain access to their bodies after death. In Britain, there were appeals during the 1870s for post-mortems to be made a universal, automatic practice within medical institutions. Despite the support of prominent alienist Sir James Crichton-Browne and others, efforts to…

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